Treatments original

Treatments Overview

 Injections

Injections — pain blocks — are often an effective approach to addressing pain and inflammation without surgery. For minor blocks, numbing medication and corticosteroids are injected into targeted areas in out-patient office procedures, using ultrasound for guidance. Major blocks are take place in a sterile operating room with IV sedation administered by board certified anesthesiologists and CRNAs; fluoroscopic guidance is used for precise delivery. More…

Head Pain & Migraines

Occipital Nerve Block: Injections are into the back of the head, just above the neck. Pain concentrated at the back of the head, including certain types of tension headaches and migraine headaches, often respond to this treatment. More …

Neck and Back Pain

Injections may help conditions such as radiculopathy, spinal stenosis and other back disorders.

Radiculopathy is inflammation or damage to a nerve in the neck or the low back. Usual symptoms are pain shooting from the lower back down into one or both legs, or pain leading from the neck into the arm. A herniated disc can cause radiculopathy.

With Spinal Stenosis, the lower spine becomes narrowed and compresses the nerves inside. This usually causes pain in the buttock or leg, and is characterized by an increase in pain with activity and a decrease in pain when leaning forward.

We use injections to treat these and other back/neck conditions. The type and site of injection depends on the condition being treated.

Epidural: Injections are into the spinal canal between the membrane surrounding the nerve roots and the interior surface formed by the vertebrae. More …

Transforaminal Epidural: injections are into the opening at the side of the spine where a nerve roots exits. More …

Facet Joint Block: Injections are into the facet joints — small joints at each segment of the spine that provide stability and help guide motion. Pain in facet joints is often because of arthritis of the spine, a back injury or stress to the back. More …

Piriformis Muscle Block: Injections are into the muscle attached to the side of the flat bone at the base of the spine just above the tailbone. Tightness in this muscle can cause sciatica, which is pain down the back of the leg. There may also be pain symptoms in the hip or lower back, and possibly in the groin, genitals and rectum. More …

Coccygeal Block: Injections are into the joint between the top of the triangular bone at the base of the spine and the base of the tailbone. When hard-to-pin-down lower back pain is accompanied by a dull ache high in the rectum, this kind of injection may confirm or disprove whether the patient’s pain is caused by coccydynia, a condition caused by impact to the tailbone. More …

Chest Pain

Intercostal Nerve Block: Injections are under the targeted rib and help relieve pain in the chest caused by shingles or a post-surgical chest scar. More …

Hip, Knee & Shoulder Pain

Sacroiliac Joint Block: Injections are into either the left or right joint. The sacroiliac joints lie next to the spine and connect the tailbone to either side of the hip. Women are more likely to develop this dysfunction, with pain on one side of the lower back, radiating down the leg to the knee, ankle or foot. More …

Lumbar & Stellate Ganglion Sympathetic Nerve Block: Injections are in the front of the neck, either to the left or right. Injuries to the shoulder, arm, wrist or hand can cause odd, burning pain lower in the body. More …

Leg Pain

Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Block:  Injections are into the nerve at the top lateral part of your thighs on each side. When there is tingling, numbness or a painful stinging sensation in the front or outer parts of the thighs, the cause is often an injury or dysfunctional pressure to the area. More …

Muscle Pain

Trigger Points: Injections are into knots of muscle that form when muscles will not relax, causing pain. More …

Interventional Pain Management

In addition to the more common treatments, Dr. Dumitru has advanced training with a vast array of diagnostic and therapeutic techniques that he can propose to patients based upon need. These include:

MILD – Minimally Invasive Lumbar Decompression: A minimally invasive procedure to remove bits of bone and tissue that are causing narrowing of a patient’s spinal canal — a condition called LSS (Lumbar Spinal Stenosis), which is characterized by pain that increases when a patient walks or stands, then subsides when sitting or bending forward. More …

Discography: An injection technique used to evaluate patients with back pain who have not responded to any of the conservative treatment options. Discography is often used for planning prior to procedures such as Intradiscal Electrothermal Therapy (see below) or a lumbar fusion by a spinal surgeon. More …

Disc Nucleoplasty: A minimally invasive procedure for patients who have lower back and/or leg pain caused by a herniated disc, and who have not responded to any of the nonsurgical options. More …

Intradiscal Electrothermal Therapy (IDET): A minimally invasive procedure for patients with chronic lower back pain who have not responded to more conservative treatments, and whose pain is thought to be caused by nerve fibers that have grown from their normal location in the outer layers of a spinal disc to inside the disc. More …

Treatment of Spasticity (Including Myoblock Injections): In addition to other medication and physical therapy, Botox may be injected directly into muscles to treat spasticity, a muscle control disorder that is characterized by tight or stiff muscles and an inability to control those muscles. More …

Spinal Cord Stimulation Trial Implantation: Used for patients who have spinal lesions that cannot be treated surgically. Treatment includes a short trial conducted with a temporary stimulator to see whether or not this is a good option for the patient. More …